Dubai cuts profile as Mideast plastic surgery hub – Washington Times

He said antioxidant phytochemicals nutrients found in nature are important for skin health because they protect cell membranes. And when it comes to veggies, the greener the better, he noted. Foods such as kale, collard greens and spinach are loaded with skin-plumping vitamins A, E and C and are rich in antioxidant phytochemicals. He said phytochemicals can also protect against UV damage, which leads to premature aging of the skin, wrinkling or potential skin cancer. Even though some foods, such as chocolate, have earned a reputation for causing acne-prone skin, Pacella said that chocolate specifically dark chocolate can have beneficial effects.
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After splashing out on medical infrastructure over the past years, Dubai already ranks globally and aims to move up the list of top international destinations for medical tourism. It plans to attract 20 million tourists by 2020 – with half a million medical tourists bringing in revenues of 2.6 billion dirhams ($710 million). The Dubai Health Authority says that around 120,000 medical tourists came last year, generating revenue of around $200 million – a 12 percent boost from the previous year. That already puts it ahead of Turkey, with 110,000 medical travelers, and Costa Rica, with 40,000 to 65,000, according to 2013 figures from Patients Beyond Borders, a U.S. group that collects data on the industry. Lebanon does not rank among top countries for medical travel, but Beirut was once the regions premier spot for nips and tucks, notably drawing many Arab celebrities.
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Parents of twins with Niemann-Pick find a treatment – CNN.com

James, whose publisher says died at age 94. Ulla Montan AP British mystery and crime novelist P.D. James, whose best-known works featured poet and Scotland Yard detective Adam Dalgliesh as a protagonist, has died at age 94, her publisher says. Phyllis Dorothy James, a baroness and award-winning writer of such books as Shroud for a Nightingale, The Black Tower and The Murder Room, was born in Oxford began writing in her late 30s and published her first novel, Cover Her Face, in 1962. A statement from publisher Knopf quoted Charles Elliott, her longtime editor, as saying: “Phyllis broke the bounds of the mystery genre. Her books were in a class of their own, consistently entertaining yet as well-written and serious as any fiction of our time. She was, moreover, a delight to be around and work with, beloved by readers and her publishers around the world.
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British Mystery Novelist P.D. James Dies At 94 | KERA News

In patients with the mutation, the nervous system is destroyed, slowly but surely. Patients struggle with movement, gradually lose the ability to speak and eventually the ability to think. Some doctors refer to it as “childhood Alzheimer’s,” since patients with the most severe genetic mutation — like Addi and Cassi — typically die as teenagers, if not sooner. Addi and Cassi recuperate at Children’s Hospital, Oakland. At the time of Addi and Cassi’s diagnosis, there was no approved treatment for Niemann-Pick, although one drug — miglustat, sold as Zavesca — was in clinical trials.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://edition.cnn.com/2014/11/21/health/hempels-genetic-disorder-niemann-pick/index.html?eref=edition

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